Monday, November 29, 2010

Who gave these architects the license to build?

Oh yes, we have heard how the four-hundred-thousand-dollars-an-unit Pinnacle and the Helix Bridge linking to the super luxurious Marina Bay Sands have won some International architectural design awards. We have also seen how we built the magnificent and expensive ION with huge LCD screens and pretend to be Shibuya. But are we really that good in building stuffs?

Because I've noticed that our architects seem to be always aiming for the big picture but missing all the small details. Like how they built the contemporary and futuristic looking bus stops with benches that are not designed for sitting.

Or when a neighbourhood mall was launched near my place, the residents discovered one escalator going up, but none coming down. Perhaps the architect felt that was the perfect way to ensure that the residents spend more time shopping in the mall. Eventually, one or two months later, probably after some complaint letters and phone calls, the downwards escalator was built.

Some may say "Aiyah, they must have used some kuching kurap architect lah! Neighbourhood mall only mah!". Then is the Singapore Expo a huge enough project?

Recently I visited the Singapore Expo for some exhibitions and thanks to the rainy season now, I finally get to see one unique design hidden in the Expo. Do you know that the roofs outside the halls have holes? I'm referring to those roofs that extend out of the main building to provide shelter for the food court and other eating places. On a sunny day, they protect you from too much sunlight when you dine alfresco. And on a rainy day, they provide a spectacular water-fall in rain forest visual effect and the eating places can call it a day or provide rain coats for their customers.

The other sight that is more spectacular than rain drops falling on tables and chairs will be the toilet queues. While there are up to ten conference halls capable of accommodating thousands if not hundreds of visitors, the architect felt confident that not all conference halls will have an event at the same time, and not all visitors will need to go at the same time. Which is why there are only three cubicles in each of the washroom next to a conference hall.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

a lot of times, architects don't build what they want to build, but what the developers want to pay for.

Anonymous said...

it is the same with homes too.

there are master bedrooms which can barely accomodate a queen size bed, god forbid tt u can get a bed for two in the 2nd and 3rd bedrooms; bomb shelters for the maid to sleep in which cannot accomodate a bed long enough for an adult; laundry corners too narrow for a washing machine....

the one that puzzles me most is why one walks through the front door into the dining room. this has now regressed to walking through the front door into the kitchen!

frankly, architects who design homes today and the authorities that approve these ridiculous designs should all be made to sleep in those absurdly small bomb shelters they design. when they are unable to straighten themselves out, they might finally start thinking out of the box!

London Architects said...

Hello,

This is really interesting take on the concept. I never thought of it that way. I came across this site recently which I think it will be a great use of new ideas and informations.

Cloudywind said...

Oh dun get me started on the HDB flat designs...

Anonymous said...

Just want to say what a great blog you got here!I’ve been around for quite a lot of time, but finally decided to show my appreciation of your work! Thumbs up, and keep it going!

chillycraps said...

Punggol MRT, another featured architecture piece, also has lots of leaks and now they are frantically repairing it.

Architects need to talk with engineers.

Anonymous said...

It was a very nice idea! Just wanna say thank you for the information you have shared. Just continue writing this kind of post. I will be your loyal reader. Thanks again.alfred angelo.